The circle is back

This wonderful circular panel was left behind by a graduating friend from last year who didn’t have room to store it.

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After starting a painting on it at the beginning of the year, I decided to stop; I had a feeling that I should wait. So, I took it off the wall and began to work on smaller paintings. Then, after a few months of consideration, I realized what the panel would become.

Because I am doing my thesis on Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) in honeybees, I have decided to use this panel as a basis for my final piece:

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This piece will function as a lenticular image (like the piece I used for the Dry Run show) where one side of the image will be a mandala of all of the fruits and vegetables we will lose without honeybees, and the other side of the image will be a farmer in a monoculture field with white cutouts of honeybees. The photo above illustrates what the transition will look like, although both images will look equally as faint/visible in the physical product.

Below was my first idea for one of the images. I decided against it because I didn’t want to be too obvious at first of what it is about. The image of the farmer in the monoculture field (monoculture = one crop in a large area) also works better conceptually, as monocultures have a huge effect on how honeybees forage, not to mention the widespread use of pesticides sprayed onto monocultures.

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In order to bring out the honeycomb effect, I am cutting each lenticular into a hexagon shape. While some lenticulars will be transitioning from left to right, others will be transitioning from up to down. This, I hope will be a subtle yet effective way to get across the idea of the honeycomb.

I finalized the image ideas last night, and saved them all as individual files this morning (each hexagon shape became its own file > 6.7″ X 8″ for both the mandala image and the farmer in the field image).

My next step is to merge the images together using SuperFlip! which is a software program by VueThru. Once my lenticular lenses/photo paper arrive in the mail, I will print all 160 hexagons and mount them to the lenses. Finally, I will mount the lenticulars onto the circular panel.

I’ve got a lot of work to do, but am SO excited to see this all come together in the end.

C

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Dry Run

Image

At the half way point of senior thesis, fine arts senior presented their work in the annual “Dry Run” art exhibition. Displayed in the Reed Gallery¬†of DAAP, my piece, “E. coli Runoff,” consisted of a lenticular print on the wall and a water system hanging above that delivered one drop of water at a time to the center of the pedestal. This piece was chosen to be displayed in the Reed’s next show, NASAD (National Association of Schools of Art and Design).

 Installation shot:

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Close-up:

E.coliRunoffTalbot